Tastes

dmcentee

Attorney by day, Scotch drinker by night

Tastes

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  1. Kilbrin

    Single Pot Still — Ireland, Ireland

    Tasted
    2.75
    2.75 out of 5 stars
  2. Rebecca Creek Fine Texas Spirit Whiskey

    Spirit — Texas, USA

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
  3. Dalmore 12 Year

    Single Malt — Highlands, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
  4. Booker's Bourbon Batch 2018-1 Kathleen's Batch

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
  5. Rowan's Creek

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    I was over at a friend’s (incidentally, one who doesn’t really drink whiskey) and he offered me some Rowan’s Creek. I never had much interest in Rowan’s Creek, as I’m not a fan of Willet Pot Still Reserve and Rowan’s Creek is another of Willet’s offerings. Still, free whiskey is free whiskey, and I’m always game to try something new. Age: NAS (formerly 12 years) Mashbill: Unknown Abv: 50.05% Price: N/A, but $36.99 at Total Wine in Houston, Texas Setting: Neat in a shot glass (sub-optimal but at least good for nosing) Nose: Maple syrup, banana, and red hots. Taste: Peanut, oak, cherry, and cinnamon. The proof provides a nice viscosity to the mouthfeel. Finish: Medium duration. Lingering cinnamon and oak. Pleasing heat. Conclusion: This was surprisingly good. The respectable proof and combination of sweet and cinnamon flavors provide an overall nice experience. I also find it somewhat interesting that it carries both cherry and peanut flavors, which are typically different flavor profiles. It’s on the pricier side for a bourbon, but I may have to pick up a bottle, as I really enjoyed this. 84/100
  6. Blanton's Original Single Barrel

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    I’ve had Blanton’s before but never done a formal review, so I decided it was time to remedy this. In the past, I remember enjoying it but not being blown away. Mashbill: Buffalo Trace #2 (higher rye) Abv: 46.5% Setting: Neat in a tumbler while at dinner Nose: Classic bourbon notes. Oak, vanilla, caramel, and some cherry. Taste: Essentially the same as above. Baking spices, vanilla, caramel, and oak. Finish: Medium to medium-long. Quite smooth. Conclusion: I don’t understand the hype for Blanton’s. It’s good – I enjoy drinking it – but it just tastes like your prototypical bourbon (albeit a fairly well-executed one), and it does nothing to differentiate itself from the pack or justify the price tag. I guess you’re paying for the pretty bottle and topper. 84/100
  7. Knob Creek Small Batch Bourbon

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    I’m generally a big fan of Beam products. The Noes consistently churn out good whiskies, yet their products have largely escaped Bourbonmania, such that they are still readily available. I’m also partial to peanut flavors in my whiskies, and most Beam products sport the famous (or infamous) Beam peanut funk. Although I’ve had Knob Creek in the past, I’d never done a formal review until now: Age: 9 years (this was poured from an older bottle that still had the age statement) Mashbill: Jim Beam Standard (76% corn, 12% rye, and 10% malted barley) Abv: 50% Price: N/A, but $24.99 at Total Wine in Houston, Texas Setting: Neat in a tumbler with friends. Nose: Oak, baking spices, brown sugar, and oranges. Taste: Same as the nose (oak, baking spices, and brown sugar), with some apple and Beam peanut flavors showing up, as well as some ethanol burn. Finish: Medium length. Bitter oak. Conclusion: The standard Knob Creek just doesn’t do it for me. Oak dominates all aspects of the whiskey, and that’s just not the flavor profile that I enjoy. It’s remarkable to me just how different the normal KC is from good single barrel store picks. That being said, it’s not a bad bourbon by any means – I’d happily drink this if that is what is on hand. I just think you can do better for the price. 73/100
  8. Booker's Bourbon Batch 2017-04 Sip Awhile

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    5.0
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    I’m a sucker for (a) high proof whiskies and (b) peanut flavors. Despite this, I’ve never had Booker’s, as I’m generally somewhat hesitant to purchase bourbons in its price range, as my perception is that you’re getting diminishing returns on your investment. When I saw Booker’s at a bar while on a trip for work, I figured it was a good chance to see whether it was worth the relatively high price tag. Age: 6 years, 8 months. Mashbill: Jim Beam Standard (76% corn, 12% rye, and 10% malted barley) Abv: 64.05% Setting: Neat in a tumbler while at dinner Nose: Lots of peanuts. Taste: Very thick and rich (almost syrupy), with more of that sweet sweet Beam peanut funk, as well as some brown sugar and baking spices. Finish: Long. Despite the high proof, it’s deceptively smooth, with more of a gentle caress than the forceful slap of something like Stagg Jr. Conclusion: Oh boy, this is another good one, particularly if one likes peanut flavors and aromas in their whiskey. It reminds me a lot of the store pick Knob Creek Single Barrel that I stocked up on. I’d have to try them side by side to determine which I like better, so I’ll just give this the same score. People claim that Booker’s has gone down-hill, but I don’t see it. I’ll have to start tracking down other releases of Booker’s. 94/100
  9. The Macallan 18 Year Sherry Oak Cask

    Single Malt — Highlands, Scotland

    Tasted
    5.0
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    I was at the old alma mater this week conducting on campus interviews for work, which was a good excuse to try some new whiskies. Last night, our recruiting team dined at a restaurant with a $100 per person minimum. After ordering food, the waiter informed us that we were still well below our minimum, so I decided to do my part. For the Firm, of course. I figured I’d start with something that I expected would be both good and overpriced. If you are reading this and immediately think Macallan, yes, you would be correct. Age: 18 years Abv: 43% Setting: Neat in a tumbler while at dinner Nose:* Traditional sherry nose (no surprise here). Fruitcake, toffee, raisins, nuts, and a note I’ll call “funk” (not a bad smell – it’s just…. Different). Outside of the funk, it smells pretty similar to the 12. **(22/25 points) Taste: Pretty much the same as above, with some white grapes and baking spices showing up. (44/50 points) Finish: Medium length and smooth. (21/25) points) Conclusion: This was enjoyable. It’s better than the 12, but I wouldn’t say it’s all that much better. Quite friendly and approachable, I can see why Macallan remains popular with the casual whisky drinking crowd. For the price, this is an easy pass for me, although I’ll gladly drink it when someone else is paying. 87/100
  10. The Balvenie Portwood 21 Year

    Single Malt — Speyside, Scotland

    Tasted
    5.0
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    was at the old alma mater this week conducting on campus interviews for work, which was a good excuse to try some new whiskies. Last night, our recruiting team dined at a restaurant with a $100 per person minimum. After ordering food, the waiter informed us that we were still well below our minimum, so I decided to do my part. For the Firm, of course. For my final drink, I went with something that I hoped could serve as dessert whisky to cap off the evening. Age: 21 years Abv: 43% Nose: Surprisingly big for being in a tumbler. It smells like, well, port, accompanied by some rich nutty and dried fruit aromas. (23/25 points) Taste: More port. More nuts. Some oak shows up, as well as what I’ll call Coca Cola. Big and rich, the mouthfeel is fairly thick for something with only a 43% ABV. (45/50 points) Finish: Medium length. Pretty much just a continuation of what came before, with perhaps a little honey as it fades away. (21/25) points) Conclusion: Tastes like desert in a bottle, which is what I was going for. Balvenie did a good job importing port flavors without overpowering the whisky, and the end result is a solid dram that is sweet without being overly so. That being said, this isn’t worth the price. I don’t know how much this particular pour cost, but I’ve seen this for around $200, and you can buy a lot of good whisky for that amount. As such, I’d gladly drink this if offered, but I would not purchase my own bottle. 89/100
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