Tastes

Scott_E

Scotch appreciator exploring the whisky world to quench my spirit.

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  1. Ardbeg Auriverdes

    Peated Single Malt — Islay, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    Peat. Loved or hated. For those who love it, Ardbeg may be the standard of peated scotches. Their core/standard range of scotches are benchmarks, measures as to the quality of a peated scotch. Thanks to @Telex for offering this sample, from way back when. As it rests and opens, images of a chilled autumn beach days comes to mind. Cedar wraps containing bacon, smoked with spearmint notes waft with a maritime brine. Not dense in peat. Rich. Dark honey, dark roast coffee and dark chocolate shavings with an earthiness. A slick texture with sweetness and earth. Sherry with dark chocolate, lemon citrus, charcoal. There is a youthful spiciness that doesn’t appear until late towards the beginning of the finish with cracked black pepper and ground cinnamon. A long lasting finish with the spicy tingle slowly fading into charcoal, tobacco, oak and the associated drying tannins. This is an Ardbeg-lite. The normally strong peat and earth are diluted, comparatively to, say, the 10 year. It’s enjoyable though the lack of maturity has deprived the dram of more potential flavors. In fairness, it’s a solid dram but is outshined by the core three. It will appeal; enjoyable, youthful but lacks a bit comparatively to its siblings. [87/100][Tasted: 2/13/21]
  2. Blackened Whiskey

    Other Whiskey — Multiple Countries

    Tasted
    3.5
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    There are some spirits I see, raise a brow and wonder what the motivation is to put celebrity face on the bottle. George Clooney, Matthew McConaughey, The Rock, @RealRonBurgundy “Is it a ploy?” “It’s probably terrible and needs a promotion face.” This is probably just the same. Judging the book by it’s cover, which is what we consciously or subconsciously all do. A perfumed nose, in contrast to the thrash metal image of Metallica. More of bubblegum rock, if I can make a musical analogy. Rose water, blood oranges, anise, milk chocolate, bananas, caramel and hazelnut. First draw is light and spicy. There is not a broad spectrum of flavors, but what’s present is pleasant. Butterscotch, black pepper, walnuts, ripened plums, A nice finish that’s lasting of barrel charcoal, cigar leaf, dark chocolate, orange zest with a hint of brown sugar. Target marketing, social conversation centerpiece or just a simple outlet for doing something different. Perhaps all three. The band is participant in a whiskey that is quite good, approachable and a bit unique. It’s not what I expected. An image of rough, brash, heavy is what I preconceived. It’s the inverse. Worthy for a dollar earned to try. Thanks @PBMichiganWolverine for the sample. [86/100][Tasted: 2/5/21]
  3. Jackson Morgan Southern Cream Salted Caramel Liqueur with Tennessee Whiskey

    Other Liqueurs — USA

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    Sitting here on a snowy nor’easter with some homemade crumb cake and this salted caramel for a nice dessert. I decided to do a quick hit review. Creamy, chocolate, salt yet satisfyingly sweet. Just on the cusp of overblown sweet but the whiskey pinch keeps it somewhat in balance with a white pepper kick. Quite similar to Baileys Irish Cream and the like. If you like the creamy cordials, this will satisfy. [87/100][$20][Tasted: 2/1/21]
    20.0 USD per Bottle
  4. Balcones FR. OAK Texas Single Malt

    American Single Malt — Texas, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Well, it’s a Saturday evening and me and the Mrs. are settling in watching The Crown (hooked). With a biting chill outside and a warming fire in, I pulled this from the sample collection. Perfectly suited for the atmosphere I believe this one should be, courtesy of Mr. Pranay (of course). A rich, dark amber-copper liquid colors contrast the clear copita glass. Take dates, figs, raisins, oranges, apples and blend them together. Add cinnamon and vanilla and stew the in an oaken pot. As it blends, steeps and melds, add milk chocolate shavings and Brioche bread to add sweetness, maltiness and yeastiness. This constitutes the full and broad nose. The arrival is hot and spicy and takes another sip or two to acclimate and taste the flavors. The flavors are dense and thick of but hard to discern. Dark chocolate (think 95% cocoa), dark coffee, dark fruits, cinnamon, cloves, cracked black pepper with oak tannins swimming freely about. Two tablespoons of water softens the brashness on the palate. That sweeter side is brought forward and the spice is pushed back while retaining the cinnamon and nutmeg; unchanged. Fruits are a bit more vibrant and a hint of grape and black cherry appears while retaining all the drying oak tannins. A long and extremely drying finish with remnants of currents and chocolate and cinnamon and oaken charcoal, almost ashy. A Texan palate punch. A rich aroma and a rich palate packed with a strong foundation. Big and bold. If this finds your way, find, be sure to allocate time as this needs time; time to open, time to explore and time to enjoy. With the addition of water, the dram becomes approachable while retaining it’s character. But I find without water, the boldness is an enjoyable unbridled, muscular dram. Find your perfect pour since you can create it to your liking managing the proper amount of water. Thank you @PBMichiganWolverine for providing me this generous sample (as always). [90/100][Tasted: 1/8/21]
  5. The Balvenie DoubleWood 17 Year

    Single Malt — Speyside, Scotland

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Opportunity presented itself where my neighbor happens to possess a bottle of this matured scotch. With much curiosity and intrigue, seeking answers, does this command the high price tag? Is it worlds better than its younger kin? Picture yourself in an apple orchard on a crisp fall day. Ripened and swollen apples and pears are front and center. Layer the orchard aromas with toffee, orange marmalade, crushed pecans and ground cinnamon. Rather strong and vivid images this one stirs. Arrives on the palate prickly, front forward, in a creamy body. As it settles in, richness of dried fruits from sherry maturation of figs, dates and currants provide a solid base which supports the added flavors of baking spices: cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves. There is a stream of vanilla and milk chocolate and a malted sweetness, ever so slight, but enough to temper the baking spices. As the palate gradually fades, the oak wood tannins dry the palate, quite strongly. Vanilla and milk chocolate, so slight, melt away leaving the palate smacking dry with a trace amount of charcoal. Not unpleasant and quite well suited for the character of the whisky. This is a deeper and richer version of the younger sibling with a stronger oak presence. There is nothing offensive in this dram and has broad appeal. I can envision one in a darkened mahogany lounge or sitting room, with a quorum of friends, reminiscing of days past over good laughs. Is it worth the premium for these experiences? Totally a subjective opinion. Worthy, though, for one to seek the experience. [88/100][Tasted: 1/2/21]
  6. Jim Beam Black Label Extra-Aged

    Bourbon — Kentucky , USA

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Part of a sample Jim Beam 12 Days of Christmas pack sampler. 12 of the 12. Samples nine to eleven were rehashes of Beam Straight, Apple and the Vanilla. Did they save the best for last? Gee, I hope so. Gentle vanilla sweetness, Cracker Jacks, bananas and toasted coconut. Definitely sweetens as opens. Lightly bodied full of sweetness and wood spices. Vanilla, cinnamon are essentially the primary binary flavors. Seeking more flavors is difficult as there isn’t much more. The decent wood spice finish with a bit of vanilla. The wood tannins last for a good length. The nose has the a touch of Old Tub (no surprise there). This was not a terrible bourbon, however it seems restrained. Now, given a choice to grab a bottle of Jim Beam, this would be the one (strictly staying in the Jim Beam line). Wild Turkey offers more for the same or lower price. [Tasted: 12/23/20]
  7. B&B by Bénédictine

    Herbal/Spice Liqueurs — France

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    No true analytical review tonight. This is more of a nostalgic review. This is essentially my father’s favorite cordial and would come out on Christmas most often. This squat brown bottle would be tucked somewhere in the back. I would be intrigued, peering at the adult “drinks”. However, I would never see anyone pour from this bottle. Flash forward many years ahead and we (wife and me) found ourselves joyfully hosting Christmas Eve. Food, wine, spirits and family were the natural tradition after evening mass. Food was plentiful. And so were the desserts. Well, for the simple pleasure for my father, I made sure I had B&B. The aroma is not all that inviting. Almost Elmer’s glue with a sweet and syrupy hazelnut undertone. If the nose is so off and odd, why do people drink this? Well, the palate is nothing of the nose. Sweet, sticky, thick with a touch of spice. Tabasco-like in sensation but is truer in flavor to fresh cinnamon spice, like Red Hots, but not artificial like Fireball. This just sips sweet and spicy and has become a nostalgic favorite of mine and is a catalyst for stirring memories and still a small sharing moment between me and my father. This will perpetually be a favorite of mine. It is a great cordial. Try a small bottle. I am sure you will find it to be enjoyable. Brandy and Benedictine (whatever that is), it will not disappoint. It may be too sweet for some. But for those with an occasional sweet tooth, you will enjoy. What spirit connections do you share with a family member loved one? What spirit conjures up memories? [12/20/20]
  8. Red Stag by Jim Beam Black Cherry

    Fruit Liqueurs — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    0.75
    0.75 out of 5 stars
    Part of a sample Jim Beam 12 Days of Christmas pack sampler. Eighth of the 12. Quick hit review. Nose is Cherry Twizlers or Cherry Vanilla Coke. Sweet. First and all consecutive sips are of a sweetened Cherry Vicks NyQuil with a dash of white pepper tingle. Finishes of unsweetened Cherry NyQuil with oak wood. The closest I can compare this to is Chambord, but this is not Chambord. Syrupy, artificial and should thusly be mixed. Try in an iced tea or or seltzer spritz. For a cordial, stick with Chambord. [Tasted: 12/17/20]
  9. Jim Beam Kentucky Fire

    Herbal/Spice Liqueurs — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    2.0
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Part of a sample Jim Beam 12 Days of Christmas pack sampler. Seventh of the 12. Quick hit review. Red hots cinnamon candy. Intense at first and settles down over time. Not much more, but then again, what else should there be? Artificial and synthetic. Cinnamon hot flavor is not as intense of the palate as is on the nose. Syrupy, but not overly thick. Consecutive sips build on the previous cinnamon hot and creates small bursts on cinnamon Red Hots intensity. Tongue prickles on the front mid tongue. A touch of dryness on the back as the tiny stabs slowly fade. Having had Fireball, I find that it is just sugar syrup with the themed cinnamon hots. Jack Daniels Fire is not as artificial as Fireball and a bit more intense and is preferable for shots or a mixer. This JB Fire falls on par with the JD though is slightly more syrupy and synthetic. Lands in the middle of the Fire spectrum (of the three). It will not disappoint if you are interested in the ‘Fire’ game. [Tasted: 12/16/20]
  10. Jim Beam Peach

    Fruit Liqueurs — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    2.25
    2.25 out of 5 stars
    Part of a sample Jim Beam 12 Days of Christmas pack sampler. Sixth of the 12. Quick hit review. Sample five was a repeat of Jim Beam straight. Light and fruity ripened peach with a splash of Sunny D. Surprisingly fruity, with vibrancy. Unfortunately no other aromas are discernible. Not sure if that is good or bad. The peach flavor carries through onto the palate, but lighter than on the nose. Again the Sunny D flavors are present. A hint of white pepper spice keeps the overt sweetness somewhat in check. Finishes with (take a guess) peach with a touch of drying tannins. This was not all that terrible for a flavored “whiskey”. However, I would regard this more of a liqueur than a flavored whiskey. Again, this is well suited for a summer mixer, say in an iced-tea. Simple fun. Simple pleasure. [Tasted: 12/12/20]
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