Tastes

Filter
Sort
  1. Belle Meade Bourbon

    Bourbon — Indiana (bottled in Tennessee), USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Purchased on a trip to SC. In general the bourbon selection and prices weren't much different from NC, but this was $9 cheaper so I decided to grab it. Grainy and dusty corn notes mixed with strong, unsweetened baking spices. A little orange peel, black pepper, and dark chocolate. It's a really good and unusual nose. One half of the aroma gives off George Dickel vibes, the other high rye bourbons like OGD 114 and Four Roses. Also a medium oak influence, as is expected if the ~6 years according to some websites is correct. It is spicy on the tongue, black pepper mixed with baking spices. Sweeter on the tongue compared to the nose. The caramel and vanilla combine nicely with the rye spice and orange peel. I'm really surprised how much aroma and flavor this 90.4 proof whiskey packs. Medium finish of rye spice, oak, and corn dust. I knew Belle Meade was a highly regarded bourbon but I was put off by the $50 price tag in NC. However, I think it is far better than almost any other low proof bourbon I've had in this price range. Anyone who likes Basil Hayden's should really look at this, you're getting a lot more for your money.
    40.99 USD per Bottle
  2. Elijah Craig Barrel Proof Bourbon Batch B520

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    4.75
    4.75 out of 5 stars
    Split bottle purchase with my brother, has been open approximately 1 month Incredible nose of caramel, brown sugar, buttery vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg with just the right amount of oak tannins. It is a classic bourbon smell, maybe one of the best examples of what you expect with outstanding bourbons. That smell carries onto the palate. It is rich and dense, really coating the tongue. Bread pudding for days, or apple pie with minimal apple influence. For its proof it is dangerously easy to sip. The ethanol burn on the tongue and finish is akin to something closer to 100 proof. ECBP B520 is really freaking good. This is in my top 5 bourbons of the last few years and is better than the A119. I haven't been a regular purchaser of ECBP releases but I think after this I may be buying every new release. For $60 this is easily one of the best values out there for high proof and longer aged bourbons.
    59.95 USD per Bottle
  3. George Dickel Bottled in Bond Tennessee Whisky 11 Year (Fall 2008)

    Tennessee — Tennessee, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    I anticipated giving this a 4.25 or 4.5 for my separate bottle kill review, but I believe in the month since it's been open the flavors and smells have all been turned down a couple notches. It's still a really good whiskey, but I liked it more when I first opened it. The GD Hand Selected Barrel is holding up better over time. I'm getting more oak and ethanol this time around, and less baking spice. The corn sweetness is a bit drier at the moment. Finish it still medium with big tannic flavors. All in all a great value whiskey, pick one up if you see it because it flies off the shelves here in NC.
    35.95 USD per Bottle
  4. Brugal 1888 Rum

    Aged Rum — Dominican Republic

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    I received this bottle for free many years ago, I believe in 2014 or 2015. My bottle does not resemble the bottle pictured on here, so it's an earlier design and possibly different tasting liquid based on what casks are listed. These are the details on the bottle. Year - 2013 Batch No. 3 Cask - White oak, American oak, Spanish oak Tons of brown sugar, molasses, and dark fruit sweetness on the nose. Some baking spice and oak, but it's overpowered by the sweetness unless you deeply inhale. Then the oak maturation and age are more prominent. That sweetness carries through on the tongue, but it is surprisingly light. With this nose I expected a denser mouthfeel, but I'll chalk up 90% of that to the watered-down 80 proof final product. The flavor does a 180 on the finish, almost resembling a sweet bourbon finish. It is less sweet and much drier on the back end. The oak, tannins, and baking spices more prominent than the nose and plalate. I get a stronger hint of ethanol here, but it dissipates quickly. Overall I've enjoyed this bottle even though rum isn't my go-to spirit of choice. It is a good sipping rum that many would enjoy neat. I think my limited experience with good aged rum has taught me this is the best starter spirit to change the drinking habits of friends who only like hard liquor in cocktails, on the rocks, or as a shot. If your friend doesn't want whiskey neat, try pouring them an aged rum first.
    35.95 USD per Bottle
  5. High West Double Rye

    Rye — (bottled in) Utah, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Split bottle purchase with my brother, second time buying a High West product after trying their American Bourbon last year. Strong botanical nose with pine needles, licorice, eucalyptus, cherry with all sugar removed, and a dry tannic rye spice. It does have that signature MGP rye nose that I dislike, but it is combined with a mixture of scents that I don't think I've experienced before in whiskey. The botanical flavor hits first on the tongue. I've seen it described as similar to gin, and I agree. The older rye in this blend I think contributes a lot. The whiskey becomes sweet on the mid-palate and finish with more pronounced baking spice and fruit. I get more cinnamon, nutmeg, and cherry associated with the low rye mashbill and long maturation in oak. The botanicals are more muted on the finish compared to the nose. Initially I was turned off by the nose because it reminded me too much of Bulleit Rye. But once it opens up in the glass, and once I tasted it, this rye was clearly in a different league. It is tasty, unique, and very drinkable. I haven't tried it in a cocktail but it seems like a flavor profile that'd work great. For the money highly recommend picking this bottle up.
    39.95 USD per Bottle
  6. Tullamore D.E.W. 12 Year Special Reserve

    Blended — Ireland

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Irish whiskey purchase in March, and this was $5 off that month making it $45 total. This was the first age-stated Irish whiskey I've had. It has a subtle nose that is a combination of Scotch single malt and Irish whiskey. Although it is supposed to be a blend of whiskeys aged in ex-bourbon and ex-Oloroso casks, the Oloroso influence is minimal. I get butterscotch, shortbread, vanilla, and oak spice. Classic Irish nose with the sharp edges of young grain whiskey rounded out by age. Mostly vanilla and shortbread on the tongue, sweeter than it smells. Kind of reminds me of a Boston creme filling. The tannins from the oak and malt character pop out on the finish. It takes you on a little journey from sweet to oak spice to sweet again. Again, barely any fruits detected from the Oloroso casks. Overall I think the whiskey is dominated by ex-bourbon casks and Irish blend, while the malt and Oloroso impact are muted. I think this is a fine whiskey. However, for the price I could've bought a number of Scotch whiskeys I haven't had or bought the cheaper Bushmills 10Y. There's not enough here that screams to me, buy this for $50. It is like an Irish take on a simple Highland single malt, which you can buy from Tomatin or Glenmorangie for less $$. I will point out that I really like the bottle and wood cork, may be one worth keeping after I'm finished.
    49.95 USD per Bottle
  7. George Dickel Hand Selected Barrel 9 Year

    Tennessee — Tennessee, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Blind tasting - 1.0 oz neat in a Glencairn George Dickel 11Y Bottled-in-Bond (Fall 2008) (50%, open 1.5 weeks, $35.95 in NC) George Dickel 9Y Hand Selected Barrel - bottle no. 114 bottled in 2018 for Cole Swindell & Carolina Country Music Festival (51.5%, open 1 month, $51.99 in SC) Color: Identical amber brown hue Nose: A - Strong spice up front with nutmeg and cinnamon, medium ethanol with big whiff, light oak sweetness compared to whiskey B, grainy corn dust note 7.5/10 B - Smells older than whiskey A, more bold oak influence with hefty dose of sweet baking spices, lighter ethanol notes, corn dust note is muted 7.5/10 Palate: A - Bright corn and hint of citrus, tannic, stronger oak and ethanol compared to whiskey B, spices more muted compared to whiskey B 6.5/10 B - Sweet oak spice, medium tannic oak, bready dessert a la bread pudding 8/10 Finish A - Medium finish, ethanol and tannins less prominent than on tongue, sweet spicy oak builds, kind of opposite to whiskey B 7.5/10 B - Medium to long finish, ethanol and oak tannin build towards the end, baking spices and sweetness more muted than on tongue 7/10 Drinkability: A - 8/10 B - 8.5/10 Total score: A = 29.5/40 B = 31/40 A = George Dickel 11Y Bottled-in-Bond (Fall 2008) B = George Dickel 9Y Hand Selected Barrel I picked up a Hand Selected Barrel for the first time on a trip to SC, a bottle I've never seen in NC. There were at least 6 of these bottles from 2018 covered in dust, clearly people don't know what they're missing. I instantly loved this 9Y barrel and thought it was significantly better than the BiB 13Y released in 2019. When shopping with my brother last week they just opened a case of the new BiB 11Y so I grabbed it. The 11Y was a clear upgrade from the 13Y. I think with both the 9Y and 11Y, the younger whiskey improves the overall flavor. The edges are more rounded, while the 13Y was a bit too oaky and tannic but still enjoyable nonetheless. Both my brother and I did this blind, and we both liked the 9Y Hand Selected Barrel slightly more. Although it was extremely difficult to tell the difference. Honestly, the only thing I liked more with the 9Y were the sweeter notes on the nose and palate. In conclusion, these are both excellent Tennessee whiskeys and I think George Dickel knocked it out of the park with their 2nd annual BiB release. Additionally, it is commonly $10-15 cheaper than the Hand Selected Barrel, so you are definitely getting a great deal. Highly recommend both bottles.
    51.99 USD per Bottle
  8. George Dickel Bottled in Bond Tennessee Whisky 11 Year (Fall 2008)

    Tennessee — Tennessee, USA

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    Blind tasting - 1.0 oz neat in a Glencairn George Dickel 11Y Bottled-in-Bond (Fall 2008) (50%, open 1.5 weeks, $35.95 in NC) George Dickel 9Y Hand Selected Barrel - bottle no. 114 bottled in 2018 for Cole Swindell & Carolina Country Music Festival (51.5%, open 1 month, $51.99 in SC) Color: Identical amber brown hue Nose: A - Strong spice up front with nutmeg and cinnamon, medium ethanol with big whiff, light oak sweetness compared to whiskey B, grainy corn dust note 7.5/10 B - Smells older than whiskey A, more bold oak influence with hefty dose of sweet baking spices, lighter ethanol notes, corn dust note is muted 7.5/10 Palate: A - Bright corn and hint of citrus, tannic, stronger oak and ethanol compared to whiskey B, spices more muted compared to whiskey B 6.5/10 B - Sweet oak spice, medium tannic oak, bready dessert a la bread pudding 8/10 Finish A - Medium finish, ethanol and tannins less prominent than on tongue, sweet spicy oak builds, kind of opposite to whiskey B 7.5/10 B - Medium to long finish, ethanol and oak tannin build towards the end, baking spices and sweetness more muted than on tongue 7/10 Drinkability: A - 8/10 B - 8.5/10 Total score: A = 29.5/40 B = 31/40 A = George Dickel 11Y Bottled-in-Bond (Fall 2008) B = George Dickel 9Y Hand Selected Barrel I picked up a Hand Selected Barrel for the first time on a trip to SC, a bottle I've never seen in NC. There were at least 6 of these bottles from 2018 covered in dust, clearly people don't know what they're missing. I instantly loved this 9Y barrel and thought it was significantly better than the BiB 13Y released in 2019. When shopping with my brother last week they just opened a case of the new BiB 11Y so I grabbed it. The 11Y was a clear upgrade from the 13Y. I think with both the 9Y and 11Y, the younger whiskey improves the overall flavor. The edges are more rounded, while the 13Y was a bit too oaky and tannic but still enjoyable nonetheless. Both my brother and I did this blind, and we both liked the 9Y Hand Selected Barrel slightly more. Although it was extremely difficult to tell the difference. Honestly, the only thing I liked more with the 9Y were the sweeter notes on the nose and palate. In conclusion, these are both excellent Tennessee whiskeys and I think George Dickel knocked it out of the park with their 2nd annual BiB release. Additionally, it is commonly $10-15 cheaper than the Hand Selected Barrel, so you are definitely getting a great deal. Highly recommend both bottles.
    35.95 USD per Bottle
  9. Larceny Barrel Proof Bourbon Batch A120

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    2.0
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Blind tasting - 1.5 oz neat in a Glencairn - both bottles less than half full Maker's Mark Cask Strength Batch 19-02 (54.8%, open since March) vs. Larceny Barrel Proof A120 (61.6%, open since February) Color: Very similar medium amber, #B slightly darker Nose: A - Subtle baking spices, cinnamon and nutmeg. Some oak mixed with citrus peel, light caramel and sugar 6/10 B - Bready oak and ethanol, toffee, nutmeg, toasted vanilla bean 6/10 Palate: A - Oak and cherry, brown sugar, cinnamon bun, ethanol burn minimal 7/10 B - Cinnamon and nutmeg flavored shortbread, stewed or jam dark fruits, burnt caramel, palate quickly overpowered by ethanol burn 4.5/10 Finish: A - Tannic oak that lingers, medium oily finish, ethanol builds quickly 5/10 B - Strongly tannic and drying, long finish that burns, one-note flavor 3/10 Drinkability: A - 6.5/10 B - 4.5/10 Total score: A = 24.5/40 B = 18/40 A = Maker's Mark Cask Strength 19-02 B = Larceny Barrel Proof A120 I was surprised that I didn't really favor one nose over the other, despite there being clear differences. What sets them apart is the palate and finish. The Larceny BP runs hot, the ethanol and oak hit the tongue quickly overpowering other flavors and dominates the finish. It is slightly unpleasant, especially compared to the MMCS. For me the Larceny is less complex and harsher to drink.
    49.95 USD per Bottle
  10. Maker's Mark Cask Strength

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.25
    3.25 out of 5 stars
    Blind tasting - 1.5 oz neat in a Glencairn - both bottles less than half full Maker's Mark Cask Strength Batch 19-02 (54.8%, open since March) vs. Larceny Barrel Proof A120 (61.6%, open since February) Color: Very similar medium amber, #B slightly darker Nose: A - Subtle baking spices, cinnamon and nutmeg. Some oak mixed with citrus peel, light caramel and sugar 6/10 B - Bready oak and ethanol, toffee, nutmeg, toasted vanilla bean 6/10 Palate: A - Oak and cherry, brown sugar, cinnamon bun, ethanol burn minimal 7/10 B - Cinnamon and nutmeg flavored shortbread, stewed or jam dark fruits, burnt caramel, palate quickly overpowered by ethanol burn 4.5/10 Finish: A - Tannic oak that lingers, medium oily finish, ethanol builds quickly 5/10 B - Strongly tannic and drying, long finish that burns, one-note flavor 3/10 Drinkability: A - 6.5/10 B - 4.5/10 Total score: A = 24.5/40 B = 18/40 A = Maker's Mark Cask Strength 19-02 B = Larceny Barrel Proof A120 I was surprised that I didn't really favor one nose over the other, despite there being clear differences. What sets them apart is the palate and finish. The Larceny BP runs hot, the ethanol and oak hit the tongue quickly overpowering other flavors and dominates the finish. It is slightly unpleasant, especially compared to the MMCS. For me the Larceny is less complex and harsher to drink.
    49.95 USD per Bottle
Results 41-50 of 141 Tastes