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  1. Port Charlotte Islay Barley 2008

    Peated Single Malt — Islay, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.25
    3.25 out of 5 stars
    Distilled from 100% Islay sourced barley from six different farms. Peated to 40ppm. Non-chill filtered and no color added. N: Very salty with bandaids and phenol counterpunching, hints of lemon, vanilla, biscuits, pine needles. P: Smoked oily peaty peanut butter on biscuits with salt and pepper with some lemon on the side. F: Black pepper, burnt oak, and a briny and oily mouth feel. Leaves an astringent and drying finish. Salty on the nose while medicinal/phenolic and peaty. Some fruit notes peek through, but are not on the forefront. Salty and drying throughout. It makes me thirsty for water, actually. I’m not really a fan of this, mainly because of the bold astringency, especially on the finish. I see this has several good reviews on here, but it didn’t go that way for me. This review is based off of an entire bottle. I spent quite a bit of time with it. I even let it set less than half full for a few months. I actually thought that it improved a little after that, but not significantly. Cheers!
  2. Wyoming Whiskey Steamboat

    Bourbon — Wyoming, USA

    Tasted
    3.25
    3.25 out of 5 stars
    Only 1,000 cases were produced, and it was only released (2018) in Wyoming. A 90 proof straight bourbon whiskey with an age statement of 5 years. This whiskey is named after the famous bucking horse (1896-1914). N: Corn, ethanol, vanilla, oak. P: Candy Corn, vanilla, caramel and a little mint. F: Short and sweet, corn and butterscotch. While I would not recommend this to anyone, it seemed fitting to drink a bottle of this while here in Wyoming this week for the 123rd Cheyenne Frontier Days. It’s sweeter than your average bourbon and not any oak on the palate or finish. The sweetness has a corn and caramel flavor to it, but it also possesses a weird “chemical corn syrup sweetness” component to it that seems artificial, but we know it can’t be because this is labeled as straight bourbon. Interesting, none the less.
    Cheyenne, Wyoming
  3. W.L. Weller Special Reserve

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.5
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    I rated/reviewed this on the Barreled app a few years ago. I thought that I would revisit this. I’ve picked this up quite frequently over the years because it was always pretty decent for the price - around $20 for a 750ml. N: Vanilla, corn, peppermint, oak, tootsie rolls, light grassy notes, pears, lemon zest. P: Oak, teaberry, cinnamon, pears, lemon, vanilla and honey. F: Oak and peppermint. Although I’m not a huge fan of this, I have always liked this for the price. I probably wouldn’t pay much more for this than somewhere in the $20 area. This has been kind of like an “old stand-by” for me, but it’s not really anymore. It’s an easy drinker and does not try and be too much.
  4. Russell's Reserve Single Barrel Bourbon

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    4.25
    4.25 out of 5 stars
    Barrel 17-342, rickhouse B, floor 6 59 1. N: Typical Wild Turkey oaken cinnamon nutmeg blend and brown sugar burst, while maple and toffee follow closely behind with a bit of herbal mint. P: Cinnamon, vanilla, brown sugar, toffee, maple, nutmeg, and hints of mint. F: Toasted oak, nutmeg, anise. I enjoyed this quite a bit. It checks just about all of the boxes. It blends sweetness and spice together very well. It packs heavy doses of maple and toffee. The Russell Reserves are usually very good, and this is no exception. Rickhouse B has a reputation for churning out some fantastic single barrel’s. While this does fall short of fantastic; it does qualify as very good.
  5. Barrell Bourbon Batch 017

    Bourbon — (bottled in) Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    112.5 proof - “A marriage of Tennessee, Indiana, and Kentucky Bourbon”. Aged 10 years, 14 years, and 15 years. The bottle carries an age statement of 10 years & 4 months. N: Pecan pie, a heap of vanilla beans, caramel apples, leather. P: Pecan pie with whipped cream, pralines, vanilla and buttered pancakes. F: Creamy mocha, pecans, and leather, baking spices and hints of pepper. This reminds me so much of pecan pie - through and through. This is fairly sweet with nice candied notes, and just a little bit of spice on the end. I would be very surprised to learn that the Kentucky portion of this is not from Heaven Hill. It has that “nutty” praline presence that is so prevalent in Heaven Hill’s lower core range (Dant, JTS Brown, etc), but can still be found in some of it’s “premium” offerings as well.
    90.0 USD per Bottle
  6. New Riff Single Barrel Barrel Proof Bourbon

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Non-chill filtered and 112.9 proof. Barrel #15-2672 (208 bottle yield) aged 4 years (distilled Spring 2015 and bottled Spring 2019). It has the same high rye mash as the Bonded version 65% corn, 30% rye, and 5% malted barley. N: Fresh cut wood, mint, nutmeg, vanilla, brown sugar and cinnamon. P: Creamy toffee, maple syrup, peppermint, vanilla and a bit of cocoa. F: Oily mouth coating keeps the toffee on the tongue just a little bit longer - then diminishes as peppermint, spices, and almonds take over. This is very similar to their bottled in bond bourbon. This is just a little more vibrant on the flavorings because of the proof. I think the relatively low age and high rye mash bill work well here. If you don’t like the spice, just let your glass air out a bit, and it will sweeten up some to balance it more if you desire (and don’t mind a little wait). It’s nicely put together and enjoyable. I look forward to their future offerings.
    50.0 USD per Bottle
  7. New Riff Kentucky Straight Bourbon Bottled In Bond

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    A 4 year old high rye straight bourbon distilled Spring 2015 and bottled Spring 2019. The mashbill is 65% corn, 30% rye, and 5% malted barley. Non-chill filtered. New Riff is not available in my home State of Michigan currently, but it is in Indiana as of April. I find myself in Indiana somewhat frequently for family and such. N: Vanilla, caramel, peppermint, nutmeg, cloves, seasoned oak, cinnamon. P: Caramel, vanilla, peppermint, cinnamon, light absinthe, baked pecans. F: Hints of ginger, dark chocolate, licorice, peppermint, allspice with a nice oily coat. New Riff is a fairly new distillery in Newport Kentucky (just south of Cincinnati over the Ohio River). The high rye and relatively low age makes the rye notes very noticeable. I really enjoyed this. I definitely would purchase another bottle. Folks that done care for much spice, are probably better off leaving this alone. At $40 (although I think I may have paid $35 for it as I believe it was part of a weekly sale when I bough it), it is more expensive than most 4 year olds, but it’s definitely better than most 4 year olds as well.
    39.99 USD per Bottle
  8. Henry McKenna 10 Year Bottled in Bond Bourbon

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    Barreled 2-2-2009. Barrel # 6189. Ironically, this is the 3rd bottle in the last few weeks that I’ve purchased that has had Groundhog Day as either the dump date, barreled date, or bottled date. N: Brown sugar, cinnamon, Bit-O-Honey, vanilla, caramel, figs, anise, rickhouse. P: Cinnamon and caramel topped brownie with raisin sprinkles with apples and licorice. F: Oak, allspice, tannic and drying. A pleasant mix of candy and spice. Lots of cinnamon and caramel play together well here. As is usually the case, the bottle sweetens up a bit over time with candied and fruit notes. I wasn’t happy about this winning best bourbon last year at the San Francisco Spirits and even less happy about it winning best of show this year in San Francisco. It probably will make this less readily available (even more so). Honestly, it boggles my mind how this could win best of show. I sure would like to try that particular barrel they had in the competition, it must have been special. This is another one that I have considered a daily drinker, because I can usually find it. Hopefully, that remains unchanged. Decent bourbon at decent price is an every increasing challenge. In a few years, there may be a glut - hopefully. We will see.
    38.99 USD per Bottle
  9. Eagle Rare 10 Year Bourbon

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    3.75
    3.75 out of 5 stars
    10 years old and 90 proof. Laser code Julian date of “19033”, or 2-2-2019. It lost the Single Barrel labeling back around 2014. Although it’s not labeled as a single barrel anymore, it estentially still is. The barrels are dumped in series. They dump a barrel - bottle it, dump a barrel - bottle it, and so on, but since there is the potential for left over bourbon between barrel dumps, some portions at the beginning and the end are mixed with the previous barrels. N: Oak, creme brûlée, cinnamon, vanilla, a little mint. P: Oak, pepper, mint, cinnamon, nutmeg, spiced maple syrup, vanilla. F: Oak, creamy cocoa, licorice, toasted oak. Oak, spice, mint, and a little vanilla for the most part. A fairly spicy bourbon, but not overly so. It’s pretty even keel all the way through from start to finish. I drink these bottles every so often. I’ve always liked them for the money. They run $31.99 around my neck of the woods. In today’s day and age, that’s a good value to me. 3.75 to 4.
    32.0 USD per Bottle
  10. Ancient Age 90 Proof

    Bourbon — Frankfort, KY, USA

    Tasted
    2.75
    2.75 out of 5 stars
    90 proof and “aged at least 36 months”. I’ve had a few of these bottles over the years, and I’m sure I’ll have more in the future. I thought I’d put a review up for it on this app. N: Cornbread, acetone, brown sugar, anise, lemon, a bit of caramel trying to hide. P: Buttered corn, butterscotch, oily peanuts, a bit of spearmint. F: Toasted oak, baking spices, licorice. Fairly similiar, but not totally identical, to the Ancient Ancient Age 10 Star (AAA 10 Star). This doesn’t have much going on with it either. It’s pretty strong with the corn notes. Although, it’s relatively decent value when you consider it’s 90 proof and was $9 or $10 a bottle. I’ve only seen this 90 proof version in Kentucky. The 80 proof version is available pretty much everywhere. I like to use this as one of my “beater whiskeys”. One that I don’t have to think or care about when out hiking, fishing, on horse back, or whatever. I wouldn’t expect many folks to drink this neat, nor would I necessarily recommend it - except for it’s value.
    9.0 USD per Bottle
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