Haig Gold Label

Blended

Haig // Scotland

    Filter
    Sort
  1. Assaad-Abou-Rached

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    12.0 USD per Bottle
  2. drlewis

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Light color, thin body. Medium smoke and earth, light cereal grain in the mouth, thin short finish. Meh.
  3. The_Rev

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    I'm a history nerd (even majored in it - my specialities are 19th and early 20th century US, Latin America, and colonial and postcolonial Africa), so the opportunity to taste a piece of history like the 1940 Haig King George V is right up my alley. The whiskey is, fortunately, quite enjoyable beyond its historical appeal. The nose is sweet and malty, honeyed cereal and fruit with a nice whiff of smoke kicking about. The palate lines up with the nose; sweet, a little fruity, and just enough smoke to remind you that this is scotch. It's hard not to enjoy on its own merits, but given its age, this becomes a special dram indeed - thanks to @PBMichiganWolverine for sharing!
  4. greg78

    Tasted
    2.0
    2.0 out of 5 stars
  5. localshot

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
  6. Scott_E

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Note: This is a review for 1940 Haig Gold Label Late George V What a treat! A chance to sample a scotch that is circa World War II. Only in a group of whisky enthusiasts could this be possible. Nose is candy sweet consisting of butterscotch, candycorn, vanilla and honey. There’s are floral and fruity notes in the sweetness. Heather, apples and raisins. Malt and milk chocolate (Whoppers) and cereal grains eventually become detectable when time is granted. It’s a lightweight, enjoyable nose. First draw is slightly peppery and sweet. As the palate gets acclimated, the whisky is notably sweet. The body is thin and lightweight. Butterscotch, vanilla, honey. The sweetness is pleasant but short giving way to a white pepper and fresh ginger spicy zing the is delivered to the finish. A short finish which is slightly oaky dry with a some charcoal with a touch of vanilla and honey sweetness. I wasn’t sure what to expect. That is were scotch palates different 60+ years ago?. It’s like a chance to jump back into time. What was the style of a whisky two generations ago as it compare today. From my perspective, it easy, sweet, inoffensive and made to enjoy without the distractions of sophistication; a social sipper. (You can transport yourself picturing Churchill or King George VI himself sipping on this during wartime). Thank you @PBMichiganWolverine for this rare treat and a glimpse of a whisky world long ago. [87/100][Tasted: 4/21/18]
  7. kijis

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
  8. John-Kousanakis

    Tasted
    2.0
    2.0 out of 5 stars
  9. Telex

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Disclaimer: This review is specifically for the Haig Gold Label, Late George V, which was bottled in 1940. Wow Pranay, this was a nice find indeed. I'll be honest, when I heard the aftermath of the present Haig marketing onslaught, and how the present product was lackluster, I thought to myself "oooh, this 1940 might not as good as I am thinking it will be". Well, it is awesome that I was incorrect. Goes to show, never think that all bottles from one distilleries are going to have a great, or a bad offering, especially if time has gone by as it has here. Wow, great vanilla wafers, dark nuts, and a hint of smoke. Is that sulfur in there? I like it! To me, this is like a "light" Jedi version of the Bowmore 15 Darkest. The Obi-Won to Darth Vader... Anyway, enough tangents. Even though the finish was short to medium, there is some gooey goodness of caramelized syrup with cherries. This goes to show, never judge a book by its cover. 4.0 This one is such a classic that the song for this dram has to be "Symphony #9" by Beethoven.
  10. LeeEvolved

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    I was able to sample a bit of this thanks to my friend Pranay as an extra to our Scottish distillery trading group. It's a bottle from the 1940 King George V series. It's a blend and comes in at the standard 40% ABV. It's a beautiful copper color and smells overly sweet just by giving it a gentle swirl. The nose smells heavily of candied corn and raspberries. It's almost all sweetness, all of the oak notes have mysteriously vanished. There's a faint musty smell that permeates through the sweet notes. It isn't off-putting, just a little funky and weird. I get an immediate burst of perfume, heavy vanilla and corn on the tongue. It leads to a higher burning sensation than I expected from a blended whisky, especially one of this age. It's a clear indication that blending skills have come a long way since the WWII era, lol. The finish is pretty short and oily. The thicker mouthfeel is warm, it just doesn't really stick around. It's a solid experience considered just how old it is. It seems to have held up rather well. I know I'd never be able to have another whisky this old on my own. Thanks again to Pranay for the chance to try something of this vintage. 3.75 stars. Cheers, my friends.
  11. Results 1-10 of 17 Tastes