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Slainte-Mhath

There is no such thing as bad whisky - some are just better than others.

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  1. Tomatin 12 Year

    Single Malt — Highlands, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.5
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    Although Tomatin 12 is classified as Highland Single Malt, its smell and taste are very similar to classic Speyside whiskies. The nose is sweet and mildly fruity with apple puree, vanilla cream and honey, whereas subdued sherry notes linger in the background. A surprisingly intense arrival with spices, baked apple and caramel is followed by rich maltiness and hazelnuts. Bittersweet chocolate characterizes the soft and moderately long finish. Altogether, a pleasant but unimposing whisky that is reasonably complex without being overly demanding. RATING: 3.5/5.0 stars ≙ 83 pts → ABOVE AVERAGE
    30.0 EUR per Bottle
  2. Lagavulin 16 Year

    Peated Single Malt — Islay, Scotland

    Tasted
    4.5
    4.5 out of 5 stars
    Is this whisky overrated and overhyped? Definitely not! Lagavulin 16 is an outstanding Single Malt from Islay and a cornerstone of Scotch whisky culture. Intense peat smoke with hints of iodine and seaweed dominates the nose, merging with soft and yet substantial sherry cask sweetness. On the palate, it tastes full-bodied, peppery and deliciously sweet with dried fruits and an overwhelming blast of dry peatiness. The finish is prolonged, warming and spicy. A superb malt that would be even better with 46% ABV, no chill filtering and natural color. RATING: 4.4/5.0 stars ≙ 90 pts → SUPERB [-]
    48.0 EUR per Bottle
  3. The Glenrothes Select Reserve

    Single Malt — Speyside, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.0
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    This Single Malt from the heart of Speyside is easily accessible, not very complex and comes without an age statement. The nose is characterized by toffee/caramel notes, citrus fruits and engaging hints of baked plums. However, the occasional spiritiness and rather intense brown sugar sweetness might be off-putting to some. On the palate, Glenrothes Select Reserve is mildly spicy and sweet with honey, vanilla cream and ripe fruits. The finish is short, clean and slightly dry. An average everyday dram which is comparable to a better Blended Scotch. RATING: 3.0/5.0 stars ≙ 80 pts → AVERAGE
    35.0 EUR per Bottle
  4. Jim Beam Original

    Bourbon — Kentucky, USA

    Tasted
    2.0
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Sippable on its own but generally meant as a mixer, Jim Beam is basic, standard and mass-produced whiskey. It's a cheap benchmark bourbon that serves as a useful point of reference when comparing to the quality of high-end spirits. Smelling fairly simple, sweet and spirity, the nose is not much of an event. Jim Beam tastes young and harsh with an underlying wood sap sweetness, toffee notes and hints of detergent. The finish is really short and to the point. A simple but honest Kentucky Straight Bourbon that will give you what you are paying for. RATING: 2.0/5.0 stars ≙ 60 pts → INFERIOR
    18.0 EUR per Bottle
  5. Arran 10 Year

    Single Malt — Islands, Scotland

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Being a rather young distillery (ESTḌ 1995), Isle of Arran is already producing some cracking good whisky. The use of high-quality casks, 46% ABV, no chill-filtration and natural color gives you an optimal version of a Single Malt. Unlike other Island whiskies, Arran 10 features an unusual tropical character. On the nose, there are exotic fruits, such as papaya, melon and kiwi. Tasting mildly spicy and almost syrupy, faint hints of oak combine with cinnamon, sweet vanilla and complex fruity notes. It's a characterful dram with a gentle and bittersweet finish. RATING: 3.9/5.0 stars ≙ 86 pts → FIRST-CLASS [-]
    29.0 EUR per Bottle
  6. Laphroaig 10 Year

    Peated Single Malt — Islay, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.5
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    A revelation to some but simply disgusting to others, Laphroaig 10 is arguably the most intense of all Single Malts. Your taste buds are shocked by the unfamiliar, dominated by dry peatiness. The nose reminds of an old steam engine, road tar and burned rubber. Rotting seaweed, iodine and mineral notes combine with chimney smoke, TCP and a cold ashtray. Flavorwise, an overwhelming phenolic blast subdues the underlying sweetness. Crisp oak and salty dryness characterize the peaty finish. Whether you love it or hate it, you will never forget it! RATING: 3.4/5.0 stars ≙ 82 pts → ABOVE AVERAGE [-]
    29.0 EUR per Bottle
  7. The Glenlivet 12 Year

    Single Malt — Speyside, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.5
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    Once been the finest distillery of Scotland's Speyside, 'The' Glenlivet is still hanging in there. Their flagship expression remains one of the best-selling Single Malts in the world and is a suitable alternative to Glenfiddich. Showing a surprising complexity, the nose is floral, fresh and delicate, emphasizing on pears and citrus fruits. On the palate, Glenlivet 12 is light and sweet, malty-fruity and easy to drink. Not a lot in the finish though: It's quick, mildly bitter and not very substantial. A classic benchmark whisky without any edges or notable highlights. RATING: 3.4/5.0 stars ≙ 82 pts → ABOVE AVERAGE [-]
    33.0 EUR per Bottle
  8. Auchentoshan 12 Year

    Single Malt — Lowlands, Scotland

    Tasted
    3.5
    3.5 out of 5 stars
    Triple distillation gives this Lowland whisky a refined, soft and creamy character. If you believe that Auchentoshan 12 is only suitable for beginners, you are missing an awful lot! The nose is light and sweet with a pleasant crème brûlée note. Gentle citrus fruits harmonize with herbal vanilla, raisins and honey. Tastewise, the sherry cask influence certainly adds to the complexity of this Single Malt. It's sweet and mildly fruity with hints of hazelnuts. The finish is clean, moderate and semidry. An intriguing whisky that is refreshingly different from the others! RATING: 3.4/5.0 stars ≙ 82 pts → ABOVE AVERAGE [-]
    29.0 EUR per Bottle
  9. Ardbeg 10 Year

    Peated Single Malt — Islay, Scotland

    Tasted
    4.0
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Ardbeg seems to be 'the new Macallan' - being highly collectible, heavily marketed and more and more expensive due to its popularity. Nevertheless, it's a cracking good Islay peat bomb and of consistently high quality. On the nose, Ardbeg 10 is uniquely intense with phenolic peat smoke, briny seaweed and an underlying sweetness. The arrival is big, bolt and in your face! Intense peatiness masks sweet and spicy notes in the background, leading to a long, substantial and slightly dry finish. A truly outstanding malt with way too much fancy marketing. RATING: 4.0/5.0 stars ≙ 88 pts → FIRST-CLASS
    38.0 EUR per Bottle
  10. Johnnie Walker Red Label

    Peated Blend — Scotland

    Tasted
    2.25
    2.25 out of 5 stars
    Well, what can you expect of this classic, low-priced Blended Scotch? Red Label is very young whisky that can be sipped on its own, given that you don't mind the youthful edginess. The nose is certainly lacking complexity, being rather bland, harsh and sweet. Surprisingly, there is a restrained but pleasant Caol Ila/Talisker peatiness coming through. On the palate, indistinct sherry/bourbon notes turn slightly bitter in the development. No real finish. Red Label will most likely end in a tumbler with ice and Coca Cola - and there is nothing wrong with that! RATING: 2.2/5.0 stars ≙ 65 pts → INFERIOR [+]
    12.0 EUR per Bottle
Results 151-160 of 171 Tastes